Alberta Nature in November

  • Project Feeder Watch starts and extends until April, www.birds.cornell.edu/pfw
  • Most Juncos will have headed south for the winter by the end of the month with some remaining over winter.
  • Waterfowl migration peaks this month.
  • Peak of White-tailed Deer breeding season. Use caution while driving.
  • Pine and Evening Grosbeaks begin to arrive.
  • Mule Deer bucks go into rut.
  • Red-tailed Hawks replaced with Rough-legged Hawks from the North.
  • Wooly Bear Caterpillars search for late blooming Asters, clovers and sunflowers.
  • Long-tailed Weasels (Ermine), as well as Snowshoe Hares, are changing into their winter coats.
  • Open water is important if there's an early freeze. Put out heated bird baths for a winter water source.
  • By mid-month, most deer are in rut, resulting in considerable movement of animals during the periods of dawn and dusk.
  • Black bears have mostly entered their dens. Grizzly bears enter dens later, often returning to their den site during the first major snowstorm of the year.
  • Snowy owls appear in fields and pastures as they drift south.
  • Porcupines are starting to court.
  • Squirrels build up their middens to take them through winter.
  • Bohemian Waxwings move into settled areas often in large flocks.
  • Beavers are safe in their lodges for the winter.
  • Common Goldeneyes and Mallards winter as far north as they find open water.
  • Many small forest birds and mammals can be attracted by "pishing" or by sucking on the back of one's hand to produce a squeak.
  • Common and Hoary Redpolls appear in yards and at feeders across Alberta.
  • Cougars are active all winter hunting primarily deer.
  • Daylight Savings Time ends Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 2:00:00 am when clocks are turned backward 1 hour to 
    1:00:00 am local standard time instead.
  • Leonid meteor shower peaks from midnight to dawn Monday, November 18.
  • Full Moon is Nov 12, 2019 at 8:34 am. This is called the "Beaver Moon."